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2006 12 03
If Hummers Can Go Green There Is Hope For The Future Of The Planet
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For Torontonians who cringe whenever they see a massive, carbon-belching Hummer squeezing through the streets of the city, this news may surprise and delight. It turns out that the designers at General Motors -- who have long seemed bent on self-destruction by producing cars few consumers wanted to buy -- have discovered that the world wants green alternatives. A generation late to be sure but suddenly they've embraced the religion of sustainability.

Take a look at their recent proposal for a "green" Hummer. Called the Hummer O2, the car produces oxygen instead of CO2:
This fuel-cell powered Hummer would produce oxygen. Agae-filled body panels could break down C02, a greenhouse gas, releasing oxygen into the atmosphere. When parked, body panels would fan out to catch more light, speeding the process. The 02 would be constructed from 100-percent post-consumer recycled aluminum.

GM and Ford managers have long seemed incapable of responding to consumer demands for fuel-efficiency and reliability. As a result, other car producers in Japan or Germany, for example, where urban density demands a smaller, more economical type of automobile, have stepped in to fill the growing demand for more efficient cars. Jobs in the North American automotive sector are now disappearing as a result of the hubris of their 20th Century management choice to ignore consumer needs and build gas-guzzling beasts like the Hummer.

Many in the green sector can take a degree of "I told you so" satisfaction. After all, it did not take too much prescience to see the future on this issue.
[email this story] Posted by R Ouellette on 12/03 at 03:11 PM

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